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What better way to celebrate Canada Day than to flash the fireworks of July 1 onto the 4 Quadrants of Canada’s cohort of Integral Leaders?

©2014 Aboriginal Nations Education, Greater Victoria School Board, BC, Canada Artist Jamin Zurowski Bear/UL. Wolf /LL. Raven/UR. Salmon/LR.   This Totem is a Gift used with permission on this Canada Issue. Please do reproduce without © Permission.

©2014 Aboriginal Nations Education, Greater Victoria School Board, BC, Canada
Artist Jamin Zurowski
Bear/UL. Wolf /LL. Raven/UR. Salmon/LR.
This Totem is a Gift used with permission on this Canada Issue. Please do reproduce without © Permission.

A whole Quadrivium of Integral Leaders were featured in the Integral Leadership Review – Canada Issue at the beginning of 2015. But the plenitude of contributors and the depth of their insights deserves a special reminder today.

Click here to read the Profiles of all the Authors of the Canada Issue – Integral Leadership Review

Here is the Table of Contents in the Canada Issue – with links to all the contributions – including the original 4 Quadrant aboriginal Totem artwork of the Cover (with poetry, thought pieces, research reports, organizational histories, pedagocial principles for teaching leaders, environmental and sustainability insights, inspiring quotations, in-depth interviews … and more):

Cover

1/15 – Cover

Editor

2/15 – Cover

Editor

Leading Comments

1/15 – A Totem for Curating a Story of Leadership in Canada

Marilyn Hamilton

2/15 – From Totem Guides and Lock Masters to World Legacy Light

Marilyn Hamilton

 

Leadership Quote

1/15 – Marshall McLuhan 

2/15 – Adrienne Clarkson, 26th Governor General of Canada (1999-2005)

Lead Poem

1/15 – Lead Poem

Tim Merry

Leadership Coaching Tips

1/15 – Leading Generative Change

Tam Lundy

2/15 – It’s not just what you do, but also how you think!

Natasha Mantler

Fresh Perspective

1/15 – Integral Coaching Canada with Laura Divine and Joanne Hunt

Marilyn Hamilton

2/15 – Dialogic Development: a Conversation with Gervase Bushe

Russ Volckmann

Leading Self

1/15 – Inching Towards Leaderless Leading

Edith Friesen

1/15 – Re-membering My Inherent Wilderness

Beth Sanders

Leading Others

1/15 – Is True Integral Leadership Possible?

Linda Shore

2/15 – Deep Presencing: Illuminating New Territory at the Bottom of the U

Leading Organizations

1/15 – Building Water Leaders and Waterpreneurs

Julia Fortier and Karen Kun

1/15 – Giving birth to Authentic Leadership in Action

Michael Chender

Leading Cultures

1/15 – A Circle of Aiijaakag, a Circle of Maangag: Integral Theory and Indigenous Leadership

Janice Simcoe

Leading World

1/15 – Integral Transformation of Value Chains: One Sky’s Integral Leadership Program in the Brazil Nut Value Chain in Peru and Bolivia

Gail Hochachka

2/15 – How ARE We To Go On Together? Our Evolutionary Crossroads

Brian and Mary Nattrass

Continuous LearningContinuous Learning

1/15 – Integral Dispositions and Transdisciplinary Knowledge Creation

Sue L. T. McGregor

1/15 – The Long and Winding Road: Leadership and Learning Principles That Transform

Brigitte Harris and Niels Agger-Gupta

2/15 – From Practice to Praxis – as Transformative Education: Leading at the Integral/Professional Interface?

Ian Wight

2/15 – Will the Next Buddha be a Sangha? Responding to the Call to Influence the Future of Collaboration

Rebecca Ejo Colwell

Book Reviews

1/15 – The Pulse of Possibility – A Retrospective Review of the Work of Bruce Sanguin

Trevor Malkinson

2/15 – (Re)Joining the Conversation: Commenting on Integral Voices on Sex, Gender, and Sexuality: Critical Inquiries

Diana Claire Douglas

Column

1/15 – Integral Design Leadership: Healthcare Design as Extraordinary Service: An Interview with Peter Jones

Lisa Norton

Poetry Gallery

1/15 – 1. Forgotten Places

Tim Merry

1/15 – 2. What’s It Gonna Take to Stay Awake?

Tim Merry

1/15 – 3. Thank You

Tim Merry

1/15 – 4. Build the Arks (King Kong Song)

Tim Merry

2/15 – 1. The Mother

Tim Merry

2/15 – 2. Human Family Tree

Tim Merry

2/15 – 3. Superman

Tim Merry

2/15 – 4. Switch it on

Tim Merry

Notes from the Field

1/15 – Integral City Development in the Russian City of Izhevsk

Eugene Pustoshkin

 

 

We wish you a Happy Canada Day of Reading and Inspiration – with Gratitude to  all the Integral Leaders in Canada.


10 More Reasons to Pop


This newsletter is published quarterly using a cycle of perspectives on the Integral City viewed from: Planet, People, Place and Power. The theme of this issue is People.

International developer Gail Hochachka proposes that people’s feelings, beliefs and worldviews affect how they are ready and willing to participate in sustainable behaviors (2005, p. 1). Moreover, she points out that traumatic experiences, like natural disasters and war, can damage people and leave them disabled from appropriate responses. Although these interior realities of a city’s population have been largely ignored or discounted because they are subjective, invisible and difficult to study, they are just as real as the exterior physical realities of the city. Interior realities create an interior environment that has just as many or more layers, contours and textures to it as geographic environments. We have studied them through the lenses of psychology, philosophy and the humanities, but until recently we have not recognized that, like our exterior qualities, they evolve and develop. We map the paleontology of our interiors through the shifts in worldviews that enable the growth of our interior landscapes and, therefore, our capacities for response, adaptability and resilience. The key centers of those internal views are the self, the other (family, clan) and the world  (society, sectors, spheres of influence, regions, globe).

Hamilton, M. (2008). Integral City: Evolutionary Intelligences for the Human Hive. Gabriola Island BC: New Society Publishers, p. 14-15

Pope Francis Offers Blueprint for Impacting a Planet of Integral Cities

With his encyclicals on the Environment and Climate Change (May, June, 2015), Pope Francis seems to be thinking as big as a Planet of Integral Cities.

Pope Francis has gifted the world with a Kosmic view of the environment and the implications for climate change. He instructs the faithful that God has not given dominion to man to dominate the environment but to respect all Life. He explicates what Integral City calls the Master Code – emphasizing that man’s individual expression must be viewed in relationship to others (particularly those in the developing world and the poor) and nature.

By implication that so many of the poor now live in cities, Pope Francis’ encyclical reveals the inextricable interconnected relationship of cities to their eco-regions and that cities everywhere have an obligation to steward not only the health of people but the health of the environment.

Pope Francis’ sweeping views that marry spirituality and science bring together the inner and outer worlds of peoples everywhere. He explicitly references our need to embrace Beauty and Goodness with our pursuit of Truth.  Without question Pope Francis has opened the door to an explicit Integral Ecology (the name of a whole chapter of the May 2015, Encyclical). In fact, in the May/June 2015 Encyclical the Pope has used the word “integral” 23 times.

Now is the time for all good people to come to the support of our sister/Mother Earth to optimize our impact on our Planet of Cities.

Many of Pope Francis’ points to make impact resonate with our series “How to Optimize Integral City Impact” (inspired by Roger Walsh’s 2014 Keynote at Integral Europe Conference). In this set of blogs we framed optimizing injunctions for the implementation and impact of Integral City Principles:

1.     How to Optimize the Impact of Integral City Work

2.     How to Optimize Integral City Impact Through Adult Development

3.     How to Optimize Integral City Impact by Getting Ideas Out Into the World

4.     How to Optimize Impact of Integral City Work from Direct Experience & Deep Wisdom

5.     How to Optimize Integral City Impact through Transconventional Religion

6.     How to Optimize Integral City Impact with Community of Practice

7.     How to Optimize Integral City Impact as Spiritual Practice

8.     How to Optimize Integral City Impact as Accomplice to the Divine

Read more on this story here.

Integral City Thinking

Integral City Blueprint

People in Dialogue: Imagine Durant Harvests Community Insights

How does Integral City work with a whole city? Durant Oklahoma is emerging as a gem of a generative action research process. We started with a visit in 2013 at the invitation of 2 City Leaders (Greg Massey, President of First United Bank, and Gary Batton, Chief of the Choctaw Nation). At that time we did due diligence with Integral City’s 12 Intelligences and came back to a small group (that became Durant’s Core Team for the next year) with a long term Proposal for Discovering, Imagining, Designing, and Delivering a unified vision for Durant and the strategies to implement it. From that Core Team, Imagine Durant was born as a project, financed by the 4 Voices of the city and guided by Executive Director, Kara Hendrickson.

Imagine Durant Vision Logo

On April 17-19, 2015, Imagine Durant began its visioning process, along with the Integral City team of: Beth Sanders, City Planner and Civic Meshworker; Linda Shore, City Management Advisor; Scott Moore, Architect and Community Planner; David Jaber, Natural Step Sustainability Expert; under the AQtivating leadership of Marilyn Hamilton.

We convened the first (of nine) dialogues where community thought leaders met to exchange and brainstorm possibilities for the future of Durant, Oklahoma. The special focus of this first round of dialogues was on the Economy and Community of Durant.

Twenty-four Thought Leaders pulled inspiration from their surroundings at the historical Three Valley Museum, located in downtown Durant. Leaders and community members from a wide variety of organizations, businesses and industries took time from their family and friends to share their stories, hopes, concerns, and visions for the city of Durant, Oklahoma.

The dialogue began with reflections among participants over an evening meal where they each shared stories of their personal connection with the community. Over the next 3 days participants asked good questions, explored four revealing scenarios (Dark Days Ahead, Status Quo, Durant Leads the Way, The Stars Aligned in Durant)  and finished with commitments to take the next steps together.

On June 13, 2015, a Public Dialogue continued the Visioning process, as citizens gathered to explore Burning Questions about Leadership Capacity, Engaging Community, Civic Management & Performance and Influencing Business Development. Participants offered generous resources including designing apps for “Discover Durant” and engaging veterans’ skills and interests with city projects.

Imagine Durant Public Dialogue

Imagine Durant Public Dialogue

In September 2015, this first round will conclude with a dialogue with Durant’s Policy Makers, presenting the Harvests from the Thought Leaders and Public and seeking input for taking ideas forward for early wins, supporting resources and aligning long-term strategies.

Read the full Thought Leaders story in the harvest report in the Resources Link below.

Pop-Up Playground: A Unique Way to Constellate Integral City Intelligences

Have you observed the “Pop-up” phenomenon that is emerging as a form of urban engagement, experiment and enterprise? Pop-ups are usually temporary co-creations of citizens, artists, performers, entrepreneurs and even serious city developers. It is often associated with “tactical urbanism” and can emerge as restaurants, retail, and/or entertainment in places like urban streets, flood plains, under bridges.

Integral City has borrowed the Pop-Up process and is combining it with Systemic Constellation Work to co-create three lunch playgrounds at Integral Theory Conference 2015

Integral-QuarterPage_01 sponsor ad

Joining MetaIntegral’s Integral Theory Conference for its fourth international event (and sponsoring the conference for the third time) Integral City has designed Pop-Up Playgrounds where we invite conference participants to harvest conference insights with the help of the Knowing Field. Lead Constellator, Diana Claire Douglas (Founder, of Knowing Field Designs) will help us to explore and experiment with our conference experience – drawing on the systemic constellation process that taps into our collective intelligence and releases energy for surprising reflections and fun results.

In the context of our Integral City engagements, we call this method AQAL Systemic Constellation Work. Guided by Integral City’s Master Code, we will co-create conditions for participants to engage conference outcomes that take care of Self, Others, ITC2015 and the Places of our hearts and homes.

We hope that you can join our Pop-Up Playground Lunch, any or all days (July 17, 18, 19, at12:30-1:45pm.)

Click here for 10 reasons to Join our Pop-Up Playground.

 

Integral City Calendar for People Quarter

  • July 16-17: Integral Theory Conference 2015 – Integral City will sponsor 3 Lunchtime Pop-Up Playground Constellations
  • September 11: Imagine Durant Policy Makers Dialogue

 

Celebrating “People-focus” in the Third Quarter 2015

June 21 marks the start of what Integral City calls the People Quarter (from June 21 toSeptember 20). What people perspectives have been inspired by the Pope’s Integral Ecology message or Durant’s Integral City practices? What inspirations, actions, methods revitalize you?  We notice that People are gaining deeper, wider, broader insights of our Planet of Cities connecting not only because of disasters and sustainability challenges but because they are motivated to wake up, grow up and clean up. Visit us at Integral City Collective on Facebook and post a short update or a photo.

Meshful Blessings for June Solstice from

Marilyn Hamilton and the Integral City Core Team

PS

Here are some some Free Resources for learning how Integral City practitioners work with People:

1. Imagine Durant Thought Leaders Harvest Report

2. Tam Lundy’s leadership tip (offered in Integral Leadership Review – Canada Issue offered a Leadership Tip on Generative Change) explains how leaders generate change through both integral thinking and practice.

Connect to Tam’s key pointing out instructions for generativity that align well with Integral City’s 12 Intelligences here and download her Generative Change: A Practical Primer.

3. Here are three blogs that give “gentle” Integral City guidance to share as “Householder Dharma”:

Householder Dharma: Optimizing Home Base with Values

Householder Dharma: Connecting People, Improving Health

Householder Dharma: Fifty Shades of Green Make Walking Delightful


Pope Francis thinks as big as a Planet of Integral Cities.

Pope Francis has gifted the world with a Kosmic view of the environment and the implications for climate change. He instructs the faithful that God has not given dominion to man to dominate the environment but to respect all Life. He explicates what Integral City calls the Master Code – emphasizing that man’s individual expression, must be viewed in relationship to others (particularly those in the developing world and the poor) and nature.

Integral City Thinking

Integral City Thinking

By implication that so many of the poor now live in cities, Pope Francis’ encyclical reveals the inextricable interconnected relationship of cities to their eco-regions and that cities everywhere have an obligation to steward not only the health of people but the health of the environment.

Pope Francis’ sweeping views that marry spirituality and science bring together the inner and outer worlds of peoples everywhere. He explicitly references our need to embrace Beauty and Goodness with our pursuit of Truth.  Without question Pope Francis has opened the door to an explicit Integral Ecology (the name of a whole chapter of the May 2015, Encyclical). In fact, in the May/June 2015 Encyclical on the Environment (now being conflated with the Encyclical on Climate Change) the Pope has used the word “integral” 23 times.

In the future, those of us in the Integral movement may argue, which came first – the  Integral Ecology Book (by Sean Esborn-Hargens and Michael Zimmerman) or Pope Francis’ sensitivity to “Integral Ecology”? But it already seems to me a moot point as Pope Francis has claimed the meme of “Integral Ecology “as core to his argument to value the poor and the environment.

In doing so Pope Francis renews our foundation for Integral City and the 4 Voices that we propose contribute to the survival, resilience and evolution of a Planet of Cities. In fact Pope Francis calls on all 4 Voices to act – whether they be Citizens choosing local food; Civil Society speaking truth to modern developers; City Managers enabling free access to potable water for all; and Business and Developers using technology wisely and growing enterprises organically.

Pope Francis does not equivocate with his warnings to egocentric modern business and calls for them to reinvent themselves with a worldcentric sensibility in thinking and acting on climate change as a planetary issue. In fact he enjoins Catholics and believers of other faiths to make common cause to create an impact (a word he uses 19 times) that can mitigate damage and adapt to change as quickly and as integrally as possible.

Many of Pope Francis’ points to make impact resonate with our series “How to Optimize Integral City Impact” (inspired by Roger Walsh’s 2014 Keynote at IEC). In this set of blogs we framed optimizing injunctions for the implementation and impact of Integral City Principles:

  1. How to Optimize the Impact of Integral City Work
  2. How to Optimize Integral City Impact Through Adult Development
  3. How to Optimize Integral City Impact by Getting Ideas Out Into the World
  4. How to Optimize Impact of Integral City Work from Direct Experience & Deep Wisdom
  5. How to Optimize Integral City Impact through Transconventional Religion
  6. How to Optimize Integral City Impact with Community of Practice
  7. How to Optimize Integral City Impact as Spiritual Practice
  8. How to Optimize Integral City Impact as Accomplice to the Divine

Now is the time for all good people to come to the support of our sister/mother Earth (as Pope Francis calls our planetary home) to optimize our impact on our Planet of Cities enacting the Master Code:

Take Care of Your Self

Take Care of Each Other

Take Care of this Place/Planet.


Pope Francis is calling for an ecological reframing for the faithful in his sweeping new encyclical on the environment. In “Laudato Si,” or “Be Praised” (or “Praised Be,”). He addresses issues that individuals must take responsibility for, as well as larger collectives – including cities.

Pope Francis warns of harming nature, the costs of industrial pollution, resource waste and he calls for renewable fuel subsidies and energy efficiency.

banner_06 globe aus-pacific

The following article was posted by Sarah Pulliam, Washington Post,June 20, 2015

Here are some of the key passages people will read closely, everything from climate change and global warming to abortion and population control.

1) Climate change has grave implications. “Each year sees the disappearance of thousands of plant and animal species which we will never know, which our children will never see, because they have been lost forever,” he writes.

2) Rich countries are destroying poor ones, and the earth is getting warmer. “The warming caused by huge consumption on the part of some rich countries has repercussions on the poorest areas of the world, especially Africa, where a rise in temperature, together with drought, has proved devastating for farming.”

3) Christians have misinterpreted Scripture and “must forcefully reject the notion that our being created in God’s image and given dominion over the earth justifies absolute domination over other creatures.”

4) The importance of access to safe drinkable water is “a basic and universal human right.”

5) Technocratic domination leads to the destruction of nature and the exploitation of people, and “by itself the market cannot guarantee integral human development and social inclusion.”

6) Population control does not address the problems of the poor. “In the face of the so-called culture of death, the family is the heart of the culture of life.” And, “Since everything is interrelated, concern for the protection of nature is also incompatible with the justification of abortion.”

7) Gender differences matter, and “valuing one’s own body in its femininity or masculinity is necessary if I am going to be able to recognize myself in an encounter with someone who is different.”

8) The international community has not acted enough: “recent World Summits on the environment have not lived up to expectations because, due to lack of political will, they were unable to reach truly meaningful and effective global agreements on the environment.” He writes, “the Church does not presume to settle scientific questions or to replace politics. But I am concerned to encourage an honest and open debate so that particular interests or ideologies will not prejudice the common good.” And, “there is urgent need of a true world political authority, as my predecessor Blessed John XXIII indicated some years ago.”

9) Individuals must act. “An integral ecology is also made up of simple daily gestures which break with the logic of violence, exploitation and selfishness,” he writes. We should also consider taking public transit, car-pooling, planting trees, turning off the lights and recycling.

10) By the way, why are we here on Earth in the first place? “What kind of world do we want to leave to those who come after us, to children who are now growing up?” he writes.

Read the original of this article here: http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/acts-of-faith/wp/2015/06/18/10-key-excerpts-from-pope-franciss-encyclical-on-the-environment/


Integral City meets Integral Theory Conferencers on our Pop-up Playground Lunch July 17, 18, 19, 2015. Why join the fun??

Integral-QuarterPage_01 sponsor ad

  1. Enjoy “Pop-Up” HARVEST Lunchbox that is supplied.
  2. Attract spontaneous, unexpected, unplanned diverse people to discover in the moment what you can do together.
  3. Co-create time, space and spirit to gather, mull, CONSTELLATE and digest energies of the conference with friends, fun and facilitators.
  4. Discover what part of the harvest you hold? What part of the harvest you seek?
  5. Actively participate in a Systemic Constellation guided by Knowing Field Designer.
  6. Experiment with the metaphor of Pop-Up Square in the City and co-create a living, dynamic, flexible container for discovering the impact behind the impact with all that you do, be, relate, create.
  7. Expect generativity, participation, a bountiful harvest.
  8. Co-create a feedback loop as conference is proceeding –  make ITC more meaningful, overcome too much in head, structured, passive downloading.
  9. Build on the mini-community you have set up with your friends at Sonoma State University Housing by joining us for Pop-Up (Day 1, Day 2 and/or Day 3 of the Conference).
  10. Experience a nourishing “emergent reward” within the conference.

Pomegranate_Object


Make walking delightful! That was the advice of the city planners who visited Abbotsford, BC in February as part of the Abbotsforward City Planning Strategy. Their argument was that walking benefitted both individual health and city wellbeing. (Studies show that walking is the single most health producing activity we can practise.)

50 Shades of Green - Make Walking Delightful

50 Shades of Green – Make Walking Delightful

I was thinking about delightful walks that same February, as I was peering down from my 6th floor balcony onto our Garden Park – an oasis of greenery amidst a streetscape of traffic, buildings and balconies. I wondered if I could see fifty shades of green?  The leaves were not yet on the trees but I could see the grass and evergreens and park benches. I could just see the brown vines on our 2 bowers and the deep green of the rhododendrons and the bushy emerald hedges. It was a sunny day and I could see people walking, strolling and sitting in Garden Park. In an hour, I knew I would be one of them, enjoying the delights of the Park as I started my daily stroll around our neighbourhood.

Why is it so important to imagine we have fifty shades of green in Garden Park? Perhaps it is because green is the colour of life? Perhaps it is because green is a reminder of hope? Perhaps it is simply because it reminds us of the seasons and cycles of Life?

Maybe for our Garden Park, something more valuable is at play? Our Garden Park is a reminder of the power of Nature in our lives. The fifty shades of green, emerge from every view, every corner, and every nook in the garden. Fifty shades of green can remind us of the Garden’s history, first planted by the developers of Garden Park Tower (and then strengthened with the placement of the Monument there) and the community builders of Clearbrook Golden Age Society. Some shades reflect the memories of ancestors whose roses and trees (dedicated in their names) remind us of the families who have contributed to the upkeep and investment in the garden. Other shades reminds us of the City public workers who have taken over the maintenance of the garden. More shades remind us of the volunteers who plant the annuals and do the heavy lifting and bending of weeding, pruning and cleaning.

Garden Park has the key qualities that make for a delightful walk in the city, because it bursts with Life. Garden Park was made with an intention to bring delight from its first design and is cared for and made special by the ongoing investment of people’s time, effort and resources to ensure that delight continues from month to month and year to year. As a result, our Park provides delights to all of our senses as it nourishes the body, mind, heart and soul of everyone who passes through our garden – whether steadied by a walker, or ably rushing home, or sunning on a park bench, or just imagining a stroll from balcony or car.

When I view the Park now in its season of spring delights – not only am I enchanted by fifty shades of green – but also by shades of yellow, red, pink, purple, white and blue. Who can resist the cheerfulness of bright daffodils or the pastel nods of first tulips?  Who remembers a wisteria bower that is more lushly in full lavender bloom than in Garden Park this April? How do we deserve the precociousness of roses that blossom in May (when other gardens in Canada are still blanketed in snow)?  Flashes of geraniums, spikes of hostas and fresh sprigs of chrysanthemums suggest more promises in summer and fall will delight us ahead.

Garden Park reflects all the seasons of Life and offers a place to connect with Nature and others throughout the year. Our Park not only makes walking delightful for our own residents, but also for all our visitors, neighbours and commercial tenants.

To imagine Garden Park Tower without its namesake Garden, is to imagine a place that would care differently for itself, for others and for the city. Garden Park Tower without our Garden would be, a place that offers no path between noisy street and building doors, no reason to pause and soak in Nature’s wonders, no reminder of Life’s seasons of renewal.

As a centre of community, and a community centre, the Garden at Garden Park Tower makes walking delightful (and much of the other activities we enjoy as well). The impact of the Park as a delightful living centre adds priceless value to our community.  It reminds us that through our Place Making and Place Caring we have created a delightful Place for delightful walks that delight all.

~~~

We come from the earth…

We return to the earth …

And in between, we garden.

(Anon)

~~~

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